WITH 90.1 FM

Bob Boilen

Jay Som is the project of 23-year-old Melina Duterte, who has been creating music for the past 10 years or so on a multitude of instruments, from guitar to trumpet. Though she played every instrument on her newest record Everybody Works, her touring band here at the Tiny Desk gave a rougher edge to some of the more premeditated sounds on her wonderful album.

Of the three songs they chose to bring to the Tiny Desk, one was a personal favorite from Everybody Works: "The Bus Song," which is a perfect swirl of stream-of-consciousness:

Ethereal and catchy don't often make a perfect pair within pop music, but the combination is exactly what hooked me on VON GREY, an Atlanta trio formed by the siblings Kathryn, Annika and Fiona von Grey.

The trio has classical music training, on cello and violins, but go further afield, as well; a Moog bass pedal, a mandolin a banjo. VON GREY have been making music publicly for the past six years, releasing their self-titled debut EP in 2012, the Awakening EP in 2014 and the Panophobia EP in 2015.

The Norwegian songwriter and singer Siv Jakobsen seems to fill her tunes with a storm of lyrical tension, sung over a sea of instrumental calm — her new album, The Nordic Mellow, is not always as intense as the song we're premiering today, "Shallow Digger," would lead you to believe. (The high-powered arrangements here, in fact, remind me of Led Zeppelin's thunderous "Immigrant Song.")

Algiers new album The Underside Of Power is one of 2017's most ambitious and intense records. I love it — but sometimes I have to just have to hit pause. There's a fierceness both in subject and sound and source, including speeches from Fred Hampton of the Black Panthers, bold and dark lyrical imagery of death and rage, sounds of people weeping, drones, chimes and what at times feels like the entire history of rock, gospel and R&B wrapped into fifty-one minutes. There's a lot to unpack here.

Ask any artist and they'll likely to tell you it's easier to write when life is dark than when it is going well. Such was the fortunate dilemma — that of happiness — of Manchester Orchestra songwriters Andy Hull and Robert McDowell.

If Jen Cloher's music has the driving, wandering feel of Courtney Barnett, it's because their lives are inextricably intertwined. The two poets and singers are a married couple; they're co-founders of Melbourne's Milk! Records; and, in this new song from Jen Cloher, you can hear Barnett's guitar along with her bassist, Bones Sloane.

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