WITH 90.1 FM

World Cafe

Monday - Friday 2PM to 4PM

Since 1991, World Cafe®, is the premier public radio showcase for contemporary music serving up an eclectic blend that includes blues, rock, world, folk, and alternative country. The show is hosted by David Dye. A passionate music enthusiast, Dye takes you on a unique journey of musical discovery as he presents a mix of music from both new and legendary artists. Live performances and intimate interviews with Dye's musical guests highlight each day's show. The show's guest roster has included Joni Mitchell, David Bowie, Dave Matthews, Elvis Costello, Robert Plant, Dolly Parton, The Shins, Lucinda Williams, Paul McCartney, Ani Difranco, Damien Rice, Ladysmith Black Mambazo, REM, Rachael Yamagata, David Byrne, Yo Yo Ma, Billy Joel, Lyle Lovett, Bela Fleck, Moby, Taj Mahal, and Coldplay, among hundreds of others.

Jesca Hoop On World Cafe

20 hours ago

Rarely have we heard a more cogent description of the creative process of a true artist than from singer-songwriter Jesca Hoop. "A great artist is not someone who is fully confident, but someone who carries self doubt," she says. "And it's that doubt that carries you into your stronger ideas."

Timothy Showalter is the band called Strand of Oaks. Originally from Indiana, Showalter now lives in Philadelphia, where he's reimagined himself as a rocker after releasing a couple of quieter albums. This latest phase of his career started with his well-received 2014 album Heal; he recently released the follow-up, Hard Love.

Over nearly two decades, Ireland's Bell X1 has mastered melodic indie pop that is bright, thoughtful and gracefully rough around the edges. It's one of the most played bands on Irish radio, it's sold out shows at home and abroad and its members have established families with kids. But to make their latest record, the members of Bell X1 had to pretend they were scrappy teenagers again.

The 1970s was an incredibly diverse decade for recorded music: from hippie folk at the start to disco, punk, the rise of reggae and the very first stirrings of hip-hop. At the beginning of the decade, Frank Sinatra had a song on the charts for 122 weeks. There was soft rock, metal and country. Album sales and progressive radio were huge.

All this is true. That's why it is so fascinating to look at the songs that ended up at the very top of Billboard's pop chart for each year of the decade — they certainly don't always represent all the change that was going on.

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